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what is Tonglen buddhism mindfulness video| daily morning yoga?

Tonglen Buddhism mindfulness


Tonglen is a contemplative Tibetan Buddhist practice. Tonglen in Tibetan means, “sending and taking” or “giving and receiving”. Judith Leith, the author of Making Friends with Death says that it is designed to “remove the obstacles that stand in the way of our natural impulse towards kindness”, this kindness or compassion starts with making friends, being kind to ourselves and as we do we begin to realize how interconnected we all are. Pema Chodron in Start Where You Are expands on this idea interconnectedness by saying that the idea of making friends with us is the doorway to creating a more compassionate and sane planet. The way we treat ourselves, the way we think about ourselves colors the way we interact with the world around us. She continues, “ Whatever we do for ourselves we do for others and whatever we do for others we do for ourselves.”
Tonglen buddhism mindfulness


 
The Tonglen practice helps us to see that our thoughts and actions do not happen in isolation, everything we do affects the interconnected web of existence.
 
When we can learn to relax, relinquish our resistance to the people and events in our lives by accepting how things are, Chodron indicates is the underlying logic of Tonglen. Leith adds that Tonglen turns our self-absorption on its head so that instead of seeing our own needs and importance above others we begin to put others first. It completely reverses the way we tend to live our lives. By taking in what we reject and sending out what we desire becomes the complete opposite to our current new age thinking of getting rid of negativity and taking all that is good.



 
In order to begin honesty, acceptance, trust and a willingness to change leads us into the practice. Sogal Rinpoche, the author of the now classic Tibetan Book of Living and Dying strongly believes that anyone can do the tonglen practice and that it is the greatest practice in befriending others and us. He continues to say that self-absorption and the insensitivity to others is at the center of our suffering. 
 
“In starting the mind transforming practice of Tonglen Christine Lonacre in Finding Death and Finding Hope suggests that developing our compassionate motivation to help others allows our own difficulties and illnesses to be grist for the mill. She adds that using Tonglen on our spiritual path reconciles our own personal suffering past and present, transforms personal relationships, prevents and relieves professional burnout and develops in us love, joy, well-being, and peace.
 
The practice of Tonglen uses the breath to breathe in anything that is painful or undesirable, you let go, accept whatever it is your holding, I the impatience at the barista for being slow to your coffee, anger at the bike rider who ran you off the footpath, the jealousy of a colleague for getting more praise, the disappointment of having your latest article rejected, the frustration when your editor says yes but means no, the restaurant that just doesn’t get what vegetarian means, breathe them in, really connect with them and what it means to be human, breathe it in, take responsibility for your actions and feelings, don’t blame others and as you do ask yourself what do you need to transform these feelings and breathe out that which changes you, what you need, acceptance, understanding, tolerance, patience, joy, love. Breathing in you may visualize or imagine the negative feelings a black cloud, breathing out imagines pure white smoke light clear air but stay with the feelings.
 
As your meditation continues to bring your understanding to knowing that others feel this way too, you may have someone in mind, a loved one who is in pain, a friend who is struggling with a relationship, feel their pain as if you can feel it in yourself, feel it in others. Breathe in their pain as though you were taking it away from them and as you breathe out to send them what you found you needed, love compassion, strength, then think of all the people around you that you don’t even know and breathe in their suffering and breathe out whatever you naturally intuit will help them. Chodron emphasizes the importance that the suffering is real, untheoretical, heartfelt, honest and vivid.  We don’t have to look far, Iraq, Syria, Remote Australia, in your hometown, at the end of your street. To end the practice accept that what you have done has really been of benefit to yourself, those close to you and those out in the world you don’t know, to all you have included in your practice.”